We need to prepare our school pupils for Wales’ dysfunctional economy


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Muddy Valley
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Muddy Valley

The concept of ‘place based education’ is great. I can recall doing projects about tourism and the fishing industry in my own home area back in the 1960s and developing and really connecting with the local economics and social history as a result. In fact, I would love to be involved in supporting such projects again 50 years on! It did help shape my goals, thought albeit later in my career. However, as is also rightly alluded to, we need to be consider that despite Brexit we live in a global economy and children need to be aware of and… Read more »

Red Dragon Jim
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Red Dragon Jim

Fantastic article to read. It’s getting into the idea of Wales being a composite of its ‘places’ and their economies. Localism at the heart of nationhood. There’s something very decentralist about this but it seems more relatable than processing school leavers into bland city region economies (I accept this will happen anyway but it’s not going to make a difference).

How can this ‘stuff’ be properly implemented? I’m surprised and dismayed that the new curriculum doesn’t even start until 2022.

Cynog Dafis
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Cynog Dafis

This is exciting stuff from Calvin Jones. It resonates, though in a different way, with a submission I sent in a Welsh Government consultation on the Cwricwlwm Cymreig a few years ago. I suggested an International Curriculum for Wales and offered a few illustrative themes for exploring Welsh history in an international context: the Formation of Britain: Enlightenment, Reason and Religion: Modernisation, Industrialisation, Radicalism and Democracy; Wales and the Colonial Experience. The national and the local need not be ‘narrow and inward-looking’. Wales in the world, the world in Wales

Tudor Rees
Guest
Tudor Rees

We also need to review our dysfunctional Higher education sector to prepare for the major problems ahead, and turn out the doctors, teachers and other professionals we need. As surveys suggest that graduates tend to settle and contribute within 20 miles of the college they attended, we need to study the Scottish Higher Education sector- e.g.”No tuition fees for Scottish students studying in Scotland” and develop our own HE sector. For example we send far too many over the border to study medicine, when we could educate them here [Beth am Ysgol Feddygol Gogledd Cymru?]

sianiflewog
Guest
sianiflewog

What a load o middle class bolox! Dysfunctional . . . edrychwch ar eich hunan/look at yourself before offering solutions.

If this is going to be the future, duw a’n helpo.

Britain, and sadly therefore also Cymru is a cast society, and is becoming more so. Learning may help the rich, it cannot help the poor until we dismantle social casts – and many of your MC readers would be very reluctant to give up the privileges that come with their rank.

jim humphreys
Guest
jim humphreys

Believe it or not, there are still occupations such as plumbers, electricians, bakers, butchers, bricklayers, mechanics, bus drivers,
sewagw workers, and so the long day wears on.

jim humphreys
Guest
jim humphreys

Okay, maybe a little hasty there, but;

Can we first ensure that our children have access to lead-free water?

Also, should boys be educated in a different way from girls?

Eos Pengwern
Guest
Eos Pengwern

The idea of engaging schools with their local areas is an excellent one. Curiously, some of the most impressive turnaround stories where struggling state schools in deprived areas have come good are to be found right on our doorstep, in Shropshire and more specifically Telford. The secondary schools there are consistently good, while the story of Wombridge Primary School is particularly impressive: https://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/failing-primary-school-pupils-assualted-11920147 [Don’t be put off by the strange URL: that’s not what the article is about at all]. Some quotes: “The turnaround in the kids’ behaviour since we started on the new curriculum has been nothing short of… Read more »

Trailorboy
Guest
Trailorboy

A lot of really interesting things here. There are so many angles that can be intertwined, in a way that could give many of a disillusioned student a real insight into a lot of things that they may genuinely be able to achieve. We could also knock down a lot of the mythology. For too long we have thought of teenagers along the old grammar-secondary modern lines i.e. either academically gifted or more suited to a trade. You can succeed in the commercial world through a good mix of social skills, guile and nouse, but if you start at the… Read more »

Leia
Guest

I look forward to seeing some actual curriculum statements and (especially) assessment details. It sounds good in principle – but so did PSE. And ESDGC. And the Curriculum Cymreig. And all of them got mashed into lipservice and box ticking for Estyn to a greater or lesser extent. I remain totally unconvinced by PISA as a meaningful measure – there’s always more than one way to score well in that style of assessment and some have lasting impact on learning and some don’t… And it’s hard to see what correlation they have in the real world or how you could… Read more »

nic
Guest
nic

Leia, you’ve got it bang on right. Why doesn’t anyone do what teachers suggest? I mean, I trained for 4 years to get my degree in education with FQTS. I studied education theory and practice, how children learn, what they ‘need’ to be effective learners… and then spent the next 20 years doing the exact opposite of what is considered excellent practice because politicians knew better. I got out because it was heartbreaking.

Leia (@leiawelsh)
Guest

It’s maddening yes. maybe we need to tackle it from the other direction and encourage teachers to go into politics instead – like the 314 Project in American trying to get scientists to run for office and garner support for them when they do!

Tame Frontiersman
Guest
Tame Frontiersman

Wn i ddim yn wir. “Hipsterism” fu’r gair Saesneg a ddaeth i’m meddwl ar ôl imi ddarllen adolygiad o’r Cwricwlwm Cenedlaethol (“Dyfodol Llwyddiannus” 2015) gan yr Athro (o’r Alban) Graham Donaldson. Derbyniwyd ei argymhellion yn llawn gan Llywodraeth Cymru. Nid oedd fawr o ddadl. Syndod, o ystyried pa mor bwysig yw addysg i unrhyw wlad. Amser a ddengys.

Jane Powell
Guest
Jane Powell

Very inspiring blog. I work in food and farming education and am looking at how local partnerships between various agencies and teachers can together create new learning projects suited to the local area. I’ve written about it here: http://www.foodsociety.wales/food-curriculum/. I see how burdened teachers are with duties and how the curriculum at the moment seems to be blocking their natural creativity, and the challenge is, how to support them and not just add to the pressure.

I’m curious about the reference to hipsterism and middle-class b****cks. Can someone explain that?